South County Dermatology

Posts for: January, 2017

By SOUTH COUNTY DERMATOLOGY
January 30, 2017
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Acne  

Stubborn acne can be difficult to treat on your own. No matter how faithfully you apply over-the-counter medications, they're not always acnestrong enough to get rid of acne and prevent it from coming back. Dr. Robert Dyer and Dr. Vincent Criscione, your dermatologists at South County Dermatology in East Greenwich, RI, share some information on more effective treatment options.

Prescription medications can help

When drugstore acne medications don't clear your skin, it's time to turn to stronger medications prescribed by your East Greenwich dermatologist. Topical medications like adapalene, tretinoin and tazarotene are applied directly to your skin. They work by unblocking pores and preventing skin oils from clogging pores. If these medications alone don't improve your acne, your dermatologist may recommend combining them with an oral or topical antibiotic for a few months. Antibiotics kill the p. acnes bacteria on your skin and decrease redness and inflammation.If you have severe cystic acne that doesn't respond to other treatments, you may benefit by taking isotretinoin, the strongest acne medication available.

Blue light therapy is effective in killing bacteria

Blue light therapy not only kills bacteria on your skin but also promotes healing. The treatment isn't painful and involves exposing your face to a blue light for about 15 minutes. You'll probably need at least two sessions per week for several weeks to notice results.

Chemical peels can rid of acne in the outer layer of skin

A chemical peel is a good choice if you want to get rid of pimples quickly. A few days after you have your peel, your skin will begin to flake off, revealing acne-free skin underneath. Chemicals peels also relieve pore blockages and encourage rapid skin cell turnover.

Help is available for stubborn acne. Dermatology services provided by Dr. Dyer and Dr. Criscione, at South County Dermatology in East Greenwich, RI, can improve the condition of your skin. Call the dermatologists at (401) 471-3376 to schedule an appointment.


By SOUTH COUNTY DERMATOLOGY
January 16, 2017
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Skin Protection   Sunburns  

Sun DamageThe sun emits harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which can result in skin damage from freckles and cosmetic blemishes to more serious conditions like cancer. Sun damage doesn’t happen overnight, and the long-term effects of repeated sun exposure may not appear for years. It’s a gradual process brought on by repeated exposure to the sun’s harmful rays, which can have serious consequences later in life. But it's never too late to start protecting your skin from sun damage!

Signs of Sun Damaged Skin

Tans or sunburns are two visible signs of sun damage. A tan reveals that your skin has attempted to protect itself from sun damage by producing melanin, the brown pigment that colors the outer layer of skin. And sunburns indicate damaged skin cell DNA, which increases your risk for skin cancer.

The following signs indicate sun-damaged skin.

  • Change in Texture - Skin may become dull and leathery as it is repeatedly exposed to the sun.
  • Age Spots - As sun exposure increases so does the body’s production of melanin, which leads to the gradual appearance of blotches in skin tone and brown, black or gray spots on the face, chest, shoulders and hands.
  • Wrinkles - As the sun depletes collagen and elastin, the substances that keep skin firm and flexible, skin sags and wrinkles appear which make you look older.
  • Red or Inflamed Skin - Symptoms of sunburn such as heat, pain, redness or blisters indicate damage to the epidermis.

The best way to maintain a youthful appearance and avoid skin cancer is to make sun protection a part of daily life. Take extra precautions when outdoors. Always apply sunscreen and wear protective clothing, such as hats and sunglasses. Limit the amount of time you spend in direct sunlight and seek shade when possible. Tanning beds are just as harmful for your skin and should also be avoided.

When to Visit Your Dermatologist

Sun damage should not be overlooked. It may be time to visit your dermatologist about potential sun damage if you:

  • Experience a severe sunburn with blistering or other serious side effects, or if you have a history of sunburns
  • Notice changes to existing skin growths or develop new or irregular shaped moles or spots, as these could be indications that you have skin cancer
  • Have sun spots on your skin, especially if they appear suddenly or are dark in color
  • Have a family history of skin cancer

At a minimum, you should visit a dermatologist once a year to have your body inspected for moles or growths. A dermatologist will not only look for signs of cancer, but can also offer cosmetic treatments to reduce the visible signs of sun damage, such as wrinkles, fine lines and age spots.


By SOUTH COUNTY DERMATOLOGY
January 03, 2017
Category: Skin Health

Excessive SweatingAbnormal, unpredictable and excessive sweating, referred to as hyperhidrosis, is a serious and difficult medical condition for millions of people worldwide. Hyperhidrosis occurs when the body’s sweat glands are overactive, which causes overabundant sweat production that is not warranted by physical activity or an emotional response to stress. This condition is often characterized by unexplainable sweaty palms, embarrassing sweat rings and dripping foreheads. 

While there is no known cause of hyperhidrosis, it may occur in people who have abnormally large sweat glands or who are genetically predisposed to hyperhidrosis. Excessive sweating may also signal more serious medical conditions such as thyroid problems, low blood sugar and other health problems. That’s why it is important to visit your physician or dermatologist when you suspect you have an abnormal sweating problem.

There’s Help

In many cases hyperhidrosis goes undiagnosed, misdiagnosed and untreated due to lack of awareness about the condition and the treatment options available. As physicians become more knowledgeable about the condition, more effective treatments are emerging—and working!

Prescription Strength Deodorants

  • When over-the-counter deodorants are not effective in managing your sweating, then you may need a stronger antiperspirant. A dermatologist may prescribe a deodorant that contains ingredients that block sweat ducts temporarily to reduce excess moisture.

Oral Medications

  • Your regular physician or dermatologist may prescribe medications to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands.

Botox

  • Botox, a popular cosmetic procedure known for treating wrinkles, may also be used to safely control hyperhidrosis. Botox helps control excess sweating by temporarily blocking the chemical signals from the nerves that stimulate the sweat glands.

Although non-life threatening, hyperhidrosis can be embarrassing, impacting your daily life both socially and professionally.  But it is also treatable. Understand your treatment options, and visit your dermatologist to learn more about managing your hyperhidrosis.